littlegreenpiyg:

Full piece converting anagnori's piece to a comic. 

Her piece on aro-ace experience is worth reading. 

(via zombiesloverainbows)

actuallyintersex:

misohead:

aaron-in-transit:

purpleferretspirit:

murasaki-pengi:

blackenedbutterfly:

emphasize:

fuzzyhorns:


L0031936 Credit: Wellcome Library, London Intersex Society of North Americawww.isna.org PO Box 3070 MI 48106-3070‘Phall-O-meter’ (Showing in actual scale currentmedical standards employed to determine nature ofgenital plastic surgery for children born withmixed sex anatomy)In copyright ? Collection: Wellcome Images

please reblog the fuck out of this

What in the actual fuck.

WHAT THE FUCK

… what the— is this legit!?

Yeah it is. The phrase “three standard deviations below the mean” is the common reason for removing a male fallus and assigning the baby a female gender.
If you think about it, this actually sums up, pretty well, our society.

It physically hurt my stomach to see this.

Same >_< I’ve reblogged this before but it needs more publicity so I’m doing it again.

Unfortunately, this is nothing new and is still used today. ~Mod A

actuallyintersex:

misohead:

aaron-in-transit:

purpleferretspirit:

murasaki-pengi:

blackenedbutterfly:

emphasize:

fuzzyhorns:

L0031936 Credit: Wellcome Library, London 
Intersex Society of North America
www.isna.org PO Box 3070 MI 48106-3070
‘Phall-O-meter’ (Showing in actual scale current
medical standards employed to determine nature of
genital plastic surgery for children born with
mixed sex anatomy)
In copyright ?
 
Collection: Wellcome Images

please reblog the fuck out of this

What in the actual fuck.

WHAT THE FUCK

… what the— is this legit!?

Yeah it is. The phrase “three standard deviations below the mean” is the common reason for removing a male fallus and assigning the baby a female gender.

If you think about it, this actually sums up, pretty well, our society.

It physically hurt my stomach to see this.

Same >_< I’ve reblogged this before but it needs more publicity so I’m doing it again.

Unfortunately, this is nothing new and is still used today. ~Mod A

(via harpotho)

kimau:

Gender in Language

(via curiously-chamomile-queer)

gaywrites:

Vocativ has released an excellent interactive graphic mapping trans rights across the country. Visibility and societal acceptance are progressing, but there is so much left to do. (via Vocativ

(via pendwick)

While it is true that gender and sex are different things, and that gender is indeed a social construct, sex isn’t the Ultimate Biological Reality that transphobes make it out to be. There’s nothing intrinsically male about XY chromosomes, testosterone, body hair, muscle mass or penises. If an alien civilization found earth, they wouldn’t look at a person with a penis and say “Oh, that must be a male, sex based on genitalia is the One Universal Constant.” Sex, like gender, is indeed socially constructed and can be changed.

If sex isn’t the All Mighty Binary Universal Constant that some people think it is, why do they place so much importance on it? The easy answer is that it gives them an excuse to misgender and exclude trans people, and specifically trans women. They can pretend they’re just standing up for science, but they’re really just saying that trans women aren’t fully women and that trans men aren’t fully men. People need to start learning about what sex really is and what social constructs really are. People need to stop misusing biology and spreading ignorance and misunderstanding. People need to stop looking for excuses for their anti-trans bigotry. All of this needs to stop and it needs to stop now.
It’s Time For People to Stop Using the Social Construct of “Biological Sex” to Defend Their Transmisogyny | Autostraddle (via thaxted)

(via gettin-spoopy-up-in-here)

Until we, as a society, are able to get over our discomfort and anxieties around producing young people who are sexually healthy adults, we’re going to continue to have the all too prevalent problems of sexual assault and rape.
Want to End Campus Sexual Assault? Tackle the Primary Issue Being Ignored | Dr. Yvonne K. Fulbright (via brutereason)

(via brutereason)

medievalpoc:

Interactive Map: The History of Gender Diversity

This interactive map from PBS is a good starting point for people who would like to learn the history of gender diversity around the world. Although the information isn’t anything I would cite directly or take without a grain of salt, it’s a testament to the fact that gender categories are nowhere near as universal as many seem to believe they are. It also isn’t complete-there are many more peoples, cultures, and genders to explore beyond the map as well.

Related: Medievalpoc tagged “qpoc”

(via fun-turtle)

Can midwives provide abortions? Can they provide medical and surgical? Is there special additional training or certification? I’ve tried looking this up but all I’ve found is that, yes it is within scope but not how or when or where they learn how. Thanks!

themidwifeisin:

The answer is yes, midwives can provide abortions.

But it’s also more complicated than that.

Even though studies show very clearly that not only do midwives and nurse practitioners provide abortions with the same success and safety rates as doctors, but they can even get better safety ratings as well, they can’t provide abortions in most states.  That’s because most states have a “physician only” law in places, stating that only MDs can provide elective terminations of pregnancy.

Now, the silly thing about that is that it is clearly a regulation only in place to make abortion access more difficult, since:

  • Midwives in almost all states can provide a manual vacuum aspiration to finish a miscarriage - the exact same procedure as an abortion.
  • Studies like the one cited above make it clear that abortions are just as safe in the hands of midwives, nurse practitioner, and physician assistants.
  • Midwives in most states can provide medical abortions, but those are only feasible up until 9 (or 11 outside of the US) weeks.
  • Midwives insert IUDs and take endometrial biopsies - two other procedures that use the exact same techniques as a first trimester abortion.

Which states DON’T have a physician-only law?

  • Vermont
  • New Hampshire
  • Oregon
  • Montana

image

image

New York is trying to get onto that list, as is California and Connecticut.  But we’ll see.  It might take years, it might take decades.

Does it take special training or a certification?

Not exactly.  Just the same as any procedure that Midwives do, it takes a little training.  When we learn to insert IUDs we are students - we watch one or two, we try one with our teachers’ hands over ours, we do one ourselves, and then we practice.  But since it is all within our scope of practice, we don’t need to get another certification or attend a special program just to provide.  It’s the law of the state, not the midwifery regulatory board that prevents midwives from providing abortions.

Many states allow for midwives to provide medical abortions.

That means just handing over some pills, so it takes no technical skill whatsoever, but it does take a knowledge base to make management decisions about it.  Read about medical abortions here. 

So the way it works is this: If you practice in a state that does not have a physician-only law, then you can search out a provider who does abortions, have them train you, and then go back to provide them wherever you practice as long as you’re covered for malpractice.  You don’t need to do anything more than that.

You won’t learn how to provide abortions in midwifery school, though, since it’s not a “core competency”.

Good luck! I hope that answers all your questions!

interactyouth:

The following intersex FAQ was compiled by the members of Inter/Act. It is intended to be a living document that we will continue to tweak, change, add-to and subtract from. Please feel free to reference it, re-blog it, and ask us questions (on tumblr or at inter.act@aiclegal.org)
What is intersex?
Intersex is an umbrella term that describes people born with intersex conditions or DSD (Differences of Sex Development). There are over 30 different conditions that cause intersex people to have physical differences inside and/or outside their bodies, making their sex neither purely male or female. Biology class has always taught us that sex is merely black and white, “male” or “female,” but now we know that’s not true. There are a lot of awesome gray areas in the middle!
What are some intersex conditions?
There are over many conditions that fall under the intersex umbrella including, but not limited to: Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome (AIS), Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia, Klinefelter Syndrome, Hypospadias, Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser Syndrome (MRKH), Swyer Syndrome, Turner Syndrome, 5-Alpha Reductase Deficiency. Please see the ISNA (Intersex Society of North America) website for more information on specific conditions.
How common are intersex people?
Intersex people are about 1-2% of the population, or 1 in every 2,000 people. That’s as common as natural born redheads! We’re not rare, just invisible.
So how come I’ve never heard of intersex before?
The intersex community has a long history of shame and secrecy, for so many reasons. For starters, many doctors have told patients that they’ll never meet anyone like themselves. Sometimes they’ll even tell them not to talk about their conditions to anyone! On top of that, doctors and parents often try to “fix” intersex kid’s bodies with unnecessary surgeries, trying to make them fit into their idea of “normal.” Not to mention each condition is different, so educating the general public is hard when there is so much information to talk about.
It sounds like intersex conditions can be hard to care for!
They can be. Finding a good doctor that you can really connect with is so important for intersex people. Sometimes doctors don’t know the best way to handle each specific person. We all need to be informed about our bodies, our options, and the research that’s been done so we can make the best decisions possible. Making an informed decision is the most important thing an intersex person can do, so please don’t rush into anything. 
How does gender fit into intersex?
Not quite as simply as you might think! Intersex relates to biological sex and a person’s genetic traits, internal and external reproductive organs, hormones, and secondary sex characteristics. Gender is more about the way somebody feels or identifies. This means intersex individuals identify as female, male, man, woman, or a multitude of identities just as non-intersex individuals do. Some examples include genderqueer, agender, third gender, two-spirit, and the list doesn’t end there.  It’s important to remember that gender is fluid, not stagnant, possibly alternating its course during a person’s journey 
How does intersex differ from transgender?
Intersex is often confused with transgender, but they are actually very different things. Intersex is when your biological sex doesn’t neatly fit into the male/female binary, but transgender is when you feel as if your assigned sex does not match your gender identity. Someone can be both intersex and transgender!
What terms can I use to talk about intersex people?
Intersex and DSD are the two current terms that most people use interchangeably. However, they both are controversial for different people.  Some of our youth feel more comfortable with DSD as it might be the only term they are familiar with, while others prefer intersex over DSD. All intersex folks have the right to self define themselves at any particular point in their journey. It’s better for people to come to their own conclusions about how they want to identify, rather than be told or pushed into identifying a certain way. If you don’t know how someone identifies, feel free to ask!
Can I use the word hermaphrodite?
No. Hermaphrodite is a harmful term that is widely considered a slur, please don’t use it. It’s a stigmatizing word that people associate with having both sets of working genetalia, which is rarely possible in humans, if at all. Some intersex folk have started reclaiming the term, but that is for them to decide and use, not for you. 
What are some other terms I should know?
Ambiguous Genitalia - Genitalia that doesn’t look clearly “male” or “female.” However, no genitals look the same, and nobody’s genitalia is “ambiguous.” It’s all just genitals!
Dyadic - Some intersex people have started using dyadic to describe those who are not intersex (meaning, they fit the “male” or “female” binary)
Cisgender- When a person’s gender identity matches their assigned sex. For example, a person assigned female at birth and identifies as a woman is considered cisgender. This term can get confusing with intersex individuals - some use it, some don’t.
HRT (Hormone Replacement Therapy)  - This is an important tool in an intersex person’s tool box. HRT ensures that an intersex person’s physical and emotional health needs are properly maintained. If someone’s hormone needs (for things like development, body regulation, or bone growth) aren’t being met, they may go on HRT to figure out the best hormone levels for their bodies.
Informed Consent - This term gets thrown a lot, especially when talking about surgeries of intersex people. Basically, it means that nobody should be operated on without their full knowledge of circumstances, repercussions, reasoning, etc. For example, babies and children are too young to fully understand and give informed consent.
Preferred Pronouns - Many people (intersex or otherwise) don’t identify as a binary gender, especially when their bodies don’t line up in a typical binary box. Ask someone what their preferred gender pronoun is. They’ll love you for it!
What are some other intersex resources?
We have an ever-growing list of resources on our page. Please check there for more information on support groups or legal help.
What can you do as an ally?
Call out others when they say harmful things. Be our advocates where you can, but also give us a chance to educate. Don’t speak over an intersex person, as chances are we’re a lot more familiar with these issues than you are. Listen and try to understand our stories, as we’re pretty incredible people. :)

interactyouth:

The following intersex FAQ was compiled by the members of Inter/Act. It is intended to be a living document that we will continue to tweak, change, add-to and subtract from. Please feel free to reference it, re-blog it, and ask us questions (on tumblr or at inter.act@aiclegal.org)

What is intersex?

Intersex is an umbrella term that describes people born with intersex conditions or DSD (Differences of Sex Development). There are over 30 different conditions that cause intersex people to have physical differences inside and/or outside their bodies, making their sex neither purely male or female. Biology class has always taught us that sex is merely black and white, “male” or “female,” but now we know that’s not true. There are a lot of awesome gray areas in the middle!

What are some intersex conditions?

There are over many conditions that fall under the intersex umbrella including, but not limited to: Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome (AIS), Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia, Klinefelter Syndrome, Hypospadias, Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser Syndrome (MRKH), Swyer Syndrome, Turner Syndrome, 5-Alpha Reductase Deficiency. Please see the ISNA (Intersex Society of North America) website for more information on specific conditions.

How common are intersex people?

Intersex people are about 1-2% of the population, or 1 in every 2,000 people. That’s as common as natural born redheads! We’re not rare, just invisible.

So how come I’ve never heard of intersex before?

The intersex community has a long history of shame and secrecy, for so many reasons. For starters, many doctors have told patients that they’ll never meet anyone like themselves. Sometimes they’ll even tell them not to talk about their conditions to anyone! On top of that, doctors and parents often try to “fix” intersex kid’s bodies with unnecessary surgeries, trying to make them fit into their idea of “normal.” Not to mention each condition is different, so educating the general public is hard when there is so much information to talk about.

It sounds like intersex conditions can be hard to care for!

They can be. Finding a good doctor that you can really connect with is so important for intersex people. Sometimes doctors don’t know the best way to handle each specific person. We all need to be informed about our bodies, our options, and the research that’s been done so we can make the best decisions possible. Making an informed decision is the most important thing an intersex person can do, so please don’t rush into anything.

How does gender fit into intersex?

Not quite as simply as you might think! Intersex relates to biological sex and a person’s genetic traits, internal and external reproductive organs, hormones, and secondary sex characteristics. Gender is more about the way somebody feels or identifies. This means intersex individuals identify as female, male, man, woman, or a multitude of identities just as non-intersex individuals do. Some examples include genderqueer, agender, third gender, two-spirit, and the list doesn’t end there.  It’s important to remember that gender is fluid, not stagnant, possibly alternating its course during a person’s journey

How does intersex differ from transgender?

Intersex is often confused with transgender, but they are actually very different things. Intersex is when your biological sex doesn’t neatly fit into the male/female binary, but transgender is when you feel as if your assigned sex does not match your gender identity. Someone can be both intersex and transgender!

What terms can I use to talk about intersex people?

Intersex and DSD are the two current terms that most people use interchangeably. However, they both are controversial for different people.  Some of our youth feel more comfortable with DSD as it might be the only term they are familiar with, while others prefer intersex over DSD. All intersex folks have the right to self define themselves at any particular point in their journey. It’s better for people to come to their own conclusions about how they want to identify, rather than be told or pushed into identifying a certain way. If you don’t know how someone identifies, feel free to ask!

Can I use the word hermaphrodite?

No. Hermaphrodite is a harmful term that is widely considered a slur, please don’t use it. It’s a stigmatizing word that people associate with having both sets of working genetalia, which is rarely possible in humans, if at all. Some intersex folk have started reclaiming the term, but that is for them to decide and use, not for you.

What are some other terms I should know?

Ambiguous Genitalia - Genitalia that doesn’t look clearly “male” or “female.” However, no genitals look the same, and nobody’s genitalia is “ambiguous.” It’s all just genitals!

Dyadic - Some intersex people have started using dyadic to describe those who are not intersex (meaning, they fit the “male” or “female” binary)

Cisgender- When a person’s gender identity matches their assigned sex. For example, a person assigned female at birth and identifies as a woman is considered cisgender. This term can get confusing with intersex individuals - some use it, some don’t.

HRT (Hormone Replacement Therapy)  - This is an important tool in an intersex person’s tool box. HRT ensures that an intersex person’s physical and emotional health needs are properly maintained. If someone’s hormone needs (for things like development, body regulation, or bone growth) aren’t being met, they may go on HRT to figure out the best hormone levels for their bodies.

Informed Consent - This term gets thrown a lot, especially when talking about surgeries of intersex people. Basically, it means that nobody should be operated on without their full knowledge of circumstances, repercussions, reasoning, etc. For example, babies and children are too young to fully understand and give informed consent.

Preferred Pronouns - Many people (intersex or otherwise) don’t identify as a binary gender, especially when their bodies don’t line up in a typical binary box. Ask someone what their preferred gender pronoun is. They’ll love you for it!

What are some other intersex resources?

We have an ever-growing list of resources on our page. Please check there for more information on support groups or legal help.

What can you do as an ally?

Call out others when they say harmful things. Be our advocates where you can, but also give us a chance to educate. Don’t speak over an intersex person, as chances are we’re a lot more familiar with these issues than you are. Listen and try to understand our stories, as we’re pretty incredible people. :)

(via gayassdevil)

For sex positive posts, posts about safer sex and sex education, and questions regarding healthy relationships of all orientations and levels of attraction.

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